Program Schedule

Current Program:

Date:Wednesday, October 14, 2015, 3:00 - 5:00
Title:Planning for Financial Sustainability
Location:Children's Creativity Museum
Cost:Cost: $15 for non-members; free for Cultural Connections members

Museums and other cultural organizations are evolving how they define and plan for a sustainable future. They are looking for new ways to fundraise and remain relevant to the audiences they serve. How do museums plan for a sustainable future in terms of financial stability?

Join us for a look at emerging trends in fundraising and development. Our panel of professionals includes Jay Auslander, Director of Gift Planning at the California Academy of Sciences; Jeri Boomgaarden, Director of Donor Servicing and Administrative Support at the East Bay Community Foundation; Elizabeth Minor PhD, Development Associate at the Hearst Museum of Anthropology; and Rebecca Ratzkin, Senior Consultant at WolfBrown.

Panelists will discuss successes and challenges in implementing new fundraising trends including crowdfunding and day-of-giving campaigns. Also, we will learn about millennial donor trends, gift acceptance policies, and donor responses to divestitures from fossil fuels.

Before the program: Visit the museum’s new Robot Coding exhibit. Complimentary admission for Cultural Connections program participants is available beginning at 2:00 p.m.

After the program: Join us at the B Restaurant and Bar to continue the discussion (720 Howard Street).

Jay Auslander, Associate Director, Gift Planning for the California Academy of Sciences is an attorney specializing in gift planning. He works with donors interested in some of the trickier mechanisms of philanthropy, working with wills, trusts and gifts of more complicated assets like art, homes and the occasional scientific collection. Jay graduated from law school in Arizona (his home state) in 2001 and moved to the Bay Area where he started his career at UC Berkeley in the area of planned giving. He continued on this path while working with SF State and the poverty fighting organization CARE. He is currently on the board of Friends of the Public Library and the San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery.

Jeri Boomgaarden is the Director of Donor Services and Administrative Support at the East Bay Community Foundation in Oakland. She is primarily responsible for driving donor engagement and donor services with individual and institutional clients who hold funds managed by the Foundation. She manages a staff of five in providing administrative support and planning for Foundation events. Prior to joining EBCF in 2012, Jeri enjoyed an 18 year career with the Clorox Company. Jeri’s team has refined all grant making procedures, fund management and created a COE (Center of Excellence) for the Foundation. Under her direction, the DSAS team leads East Bay Gives and has been recognized by Give Local America for the program’s success and tremendous growth. In 2015, EBCF tripled the number of dollars raised over 2014.

Elizabeth Minor, PhD is Development Associate at the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology. She fell in love with archaeology as a child when poring over photographs of Tutankhamun’s tomb. She remembers touring the Hearst Museum basement with her mother and wanting to know what was in every cabinet. While a graduate student at Cal she had the chance to find out while working on many registration and photography projects for the Reisner Egyptian archaeology collections. Her work at the Hearst Museum has been a whirlwind tour of the rest of the world as projects have introduced her to objects from Africa, Asia, Europe, Oceania and beyond. She has excavated in Sudan, Egypt and California—specializing in database design, digital asset management, and advanced imaging techniques. Her research, which looks at the socio-political use of object collection and display in ancient Nubia (Kerma), greatly informs her approach to the creation of accessible and engaged museum resources for modern audiences.

Rebecca Ratzkin is a senior consultant in WolfBrown’s San Francisco office. She has led donor and customer segmentation studies in the theatre, opera, orchestra and multidisciplinary presenting fields, and is co-author of WolfBrown’s 2011 publication, “Making Sense of Audience Engagement.” Rebecca is currently directing a capacity building initiative around the collection and application of audience feedback in the Bay Area, a community-led study around creative capacity in Santa Barbara, and baseline and evaluative research for Pacific Symphony’s Engaging Chinese American Communities project.